and then recognize their freedom to write the other half

Antanas Mockus:

“(politics) is about leading, but not directing: What people love most is when you write on the blackboard a risky first half of a sentence and then recognize their freedom to write the other half.”

and then we move on

ncac:

Her advice to adults offended by the children’s literature that is staying on the shelves:

When your child at four years old picks up a book that they probably couldn’t read and says, ‘Mama, I don’t understand this.’ Let me tell you how I answer that. ‘Well, honey, some of us live differently than others.’ And then we move on.

we are very careful to not say

ben goldacre:

In medicine, we are very careful to not say ‘a schizophrenic’, we say, ‘a person with schizophrenia’.

they go through life attempting to create safety and control

michael singer:

You can do one of two things with fear: you can recognize that you have it and work to release it, or you can keep it and try to hide from it. Because people don’t deal with fear objectively, they don’t understand it. They end up keeping their fear and trying to prevent things from happening that would stimulate it. They go through life attempting to create safety and control by defining how they need life to be in order to be okay. This is how the world becomes frightening.

where’s the work

the epigraph in work rules is a line from a Springsteen song:

Where’s the work that’ll set my hands, my soul free

what’s it like to be a woman in comics

vanity fair:

“I hate when I get asked, ‘What’s it like to be a woman in comics?’” she tells them. Then, imagining her sarcastic response: “‘Well, I sit around typing with my vagina, but that gets uncomfortable after a while.’ The notion that somehow women are wildly different infuriates me. Fuck those people.”

the act, the doing, is absolutely critical and will transform you

adele diamond:

A lot of my perspective is based on Abraham Heschel. And one of the things he wrote is, I think, very applicable to child development because he said the act teaches you the meaning of the act. He said, “I don’t care why you’re doing the good deed. Do the good deed.” And that’s a wonderful lesson for children. Say, “I want you to do this.” And you say, “Well, you know, I’m only doing it for you. How’s that going to be any good?” And you say, “Just do it. Just do it fully and do it and you’ll get something out of the doing. The act, the doing, is absolutely critical and will transform you.”